Nile Project | Music of the Nile

A musical project aiming to create spaces for rich cultural interaction between Nile Basin countries launched its music gathering in Nairobi, Kenya at Kuona Trust Arts Centre.

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The second edition of the musical residency — lead by Miles Jay — brings together 14 talented musicians from Burundi, Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, South Sudan, Sudan and Uganda who will, in a collaborative manner, compose a body of songs inspired by the Nile Basin’s diversity in music traditions and instruments.

alsarah performing

This year, the nile project plan was to build on the success of last year by inviting a more diverse pool of musicians, expanding its performance circuit to more Nile Basin countries, and launching the project’s education and innovation programmes at partner universities.

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The Nile Project not only utilises music as a common language, to bridge gaps across diverse cultures that exist around the Nile, but also hosts ‘Nile Workshops’ at universities, starting with Egyptian universities in late last year.

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The African tour set to take place this year’s residency will include not only concerts promoting the new musical collaboration but also talks and workshops on sustainability and development challenges of the Nile at universities in Uganda, Tanzania, Kenya, Ethiopia and Egypt.

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In addition to the workshops, the crew is launching ‘The Nile Prize’ targeted at students who develop innovative solutions to regional challenges. These projects will be supported by the programme over the span of one year.

crying for mother nature

Through music and workshops, the Nile Project sets out to expose audiences to the music of neighbouring countries and offer a space of open dialogue around Nile issues. The project aims to connect the 11 nations, and 437 million people, who live around the Nile but that often fail at recognising themselves as a region.

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Due to polarisation in these countries caused by tense political relations and conflicting media coverage, especially recently with the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam capturing headlines around the world, the Nile Project attempts to offer an alternative path for dialogue and communication among Nile Basin citizens.

the nile project

This is the Nile Project, celebrating the Nile day at Kuona Trust Arts Centre in Nairobi, Kenya.

Photography:: Joel Lukhovi

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Mt. Longonot 2013/14

Well 2013 is just about to come to an end. How time goes fast! Am here, already climbing Mt. Longonot crater, hoping to go round the 7.2km disc of rocks. I am discovering the inner me, come 2014. Doing my last day of the year 2013, at least on top of the crater.

Sample some of the images. More to come next year!!

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Photography :: Joel Lukhovi

Location :: Mt. Longonot Crater

Literary photograph

I woke up this morning to heavy fog in Masaka town, during my international art residency in Uganda and the feeling was totally exciting. Felt like part of my life was starting all over again. Here are a couple of images i decided to take within a snap and share with the world about this feeling.

Landscape photography always brings a lot of adventures and wonderful sceneries around the world.

Landscape photography always brings a lot of adventures and wonderful sceneries around the world.

The sun was just minutes away from rising up and I felt the contrast of the clouds and the glowing sunlight would just make a perfect shot for the occasion.

Landscape photography means to capture the beautiful places that have been with out any doubt created by God.

Landscape photography means to capture the beautiful places that have been with out any doubt created by God.

Now this is always a difficult one and I’ve spent a good while trying to work out which images represent something about me rather than just about the things I have found or the light that I saw them in. This is a little strange as they aren’t always necessarily my ‘best’ photographs but I’ve added a little text to each one.

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Am motivated by an appreciation of the beauty of the natural environment and a desire to see it preserved.

Land may be desert, mountain, plain, ridge etc. For me nature is not landscape, but the dynamism of visual forces. Landscape photography is proposed to show special spaces within the world, sometimes enormous and never-ending, but other times tiny.

Photography ::  Joe Lukhovi

Fate of marine eco-systems

The marine environment is already registering the impacts of climate change. The current increase in global temperature of 0.7°C since pre-industrial times is disrupting life in the oceans, from the tropics to the poles.

Marine ecosystems are centrally important to the biology of the planet, yet a comprehensive understanding of how anthropogenic climate change is affecting them has been poorly developed. Recent studies indicate that rapidly rising greenhouse gas concentrations are driving ocean systems toward conditions not seen for millions of years, with an associated risk of fundamental and irreversible ecological transformation.

One of the most visually dramatic effects of climate change is coral bleaching, a stress response caused by high water temperatures that can lead to coral death.

Mama Ngina/Likoni channel- Mombasa: One of the most visually dramatic effects of climate change is coral bleaching, a stress response caused by high water temperatures that can lead to coral death.

The impacts of anthropogenic climate change so far include decreased ocean productivity, altered food web dynamics, reduced abundance of habitat-forming species, shifting species distributions, and a greater incidence of disease. Although there is considerable uncertainty about the spatial and temporal details, climate change is clearly and fundamentally altering ocean ecosystems. Further change will continue to create enormous challenges and costs for societies worldwide, particularly those in the developing countries.

Changes to marine ecosystems from rising global temperatures already have shown an impact on the marine species as depicted by the above image shot in Old Port, Mombasa.

Fort Jesus – Mombasa: Changes to marine ecosystems from rising global temperatures already have shown an impact on the marine species as depicted by the above image.

After absorbing a large proportion of the carbon dioxide released by human activities, the oceans are becoming acidic. If it weren’t for the oceans, the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere would be much higher.
The effect could be that fish, squid, and other gilled marine animals may find it harder to breathe, as the dissolved oxygen essential for their life becomes difficult to extract as water becomes more acidic. Shellfish, crabs, lobsters, and corals may find it more difficult to build their calcium carbonate shells. In some areas, calcium carbonate shells may even start to dissolve.

Fort Jesus - Mombasa: Rising water levels have serious impacts on marine ecosystems. The amount of light reaching offshore plants and algae dependent on photosynthesis could be reduced, while coastal habitats are already being flooded.

Old Port – Mombasa: Rising water levels have serious impacts on marine ecosystems. Amount of light reaching offshore plants and algae dependent on photosynthesis could be reduced, while coastal habitats are already being flooded.

Marine species affected by climate change include plankton – which forms the basis of marine food chains – corals, fish, polar bears, walruses, seals, sea lions, penguins, and seabirds. The Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change predicts a further rise of between 1.4°C and 5.8°C by the end of the century. Climate change could therefore well be the Knock-Out punch for many species, which are already under stress from overfishing and habitat loss.

Will the governments and international climate change negotiations continue with the climate change politics as poor innocent people and animal species succumb to death?

Photography:: Joe Lukhovi

Mombasa, kenya

One Time Climate

We are living in a climate-changed world. At a one degree average temperature increase, our planet has already been pushed to the limit, and communities across the globe are feeling the harsh impacts. It is those who are least responsible for this crisis that are being dealt the strongest blows. Climate change is no longer some kind of distant future scenario, it is happening here and now, and requires a response like nothing we have ever seen before. People are looking out for the real deal!

An acacia tree standing alone at the shore of the expanding lake Elementaita, Rift Valley.

An acacia tree standing alone at the shore of the expanding lake Elementaita, Rift Valley.

One Time is a statement of solidarity with the people living and fighting on the front lines of a warmed world. Even as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change talks in Doha are in progress, we need to stand together and address the situation of climate change with the seriousness it deserves. Many people all over the world are suffering and this ought to be a reminder to negotiators, politicians, and the entire UN that we the people will not back down.

A fallen tree lying almost in the middle of the lake. Effects of climate change

A fallen tree lying almost in the middle of the lake. Effects of climate change.

We refuse to compromise present and future lives and livelihoods. It is a statement of solidarity with communities on the front line of the expansion of the fossil fuel industry – an affirmation of our support for the rights of Indigenous peoples and frontline communities threatened by environmental and climate injustice. It is a declaration that we will not stand idly by as the planet is sold to the interests of the few on the backs of the many.

Climate change does not happen in isolation. The changing environment cannot be divorced from our political and economic systems. We cannot rise to this unprecedented challenge without acknowledging that climate change forces a fundamental shift in global society. It means shifting to a society that values people and the planet over profit and pollution. Deeper than that, it requires recognition that the struggles of people around the globe are rooted together, and that solutions do not exist in isolation.

Flamingoes roaming Lake Elementaita early in the morning. Their feeding and wading patterns have somehow been affected.

Flamingoes roaming Lake Elementaita early in the morning. Their feeding and wading patterns have somehow been affected.

By ignoring environmental limits for the past few decades, we have come to a point of reckoning Peoples’ movements worldwide are rising to challenge the status quo of economic and environmental injustice. Find unity in global struggles against the root causes of climate injustice. Connect to the One Time project.

Photography :: Joe Lukhovi

Location :: Lake Elementaita, Rift Valley

 

The lakeside beauty

For the past 3 months I have been involved in some traveling expeditions in and out of the country. It all began when I got this new and exciting job opportunity that required me to move around major cities and towns in Eastern Africa. Purpose, documenting the people’s lifestyle, culture and how their nightlife works.

However, being a wildlife and nature enthusiast, I would end up visiting the wildlife and natural scenarios/centres along the way contributing to my own personal work.

These are part of the images i took while at the lake Nakuru national park. The beauty that the lake posses is beyond word. Also the thing that captured my eyes was the fact that the lake is expanding its banks due to the Mau forest conservation.

The size of the lake has eventually expanded kilometers inside letting the management redesign the path way to facilitate ease of movement. This is a positive feedback and my hope is that the lake will continue being a hub of many kind of species of birds and land animals as well.

In the next couple of weeks i will be dedicate myself in posting the wonderful moments i have experienced first hand and the beautiful people i have come across in “Hyped East Africa” tour.

Photography :: Joe Lukhovi

Lake Nakuru national park

Connect the climate dots

It was extreme pleasure getting to be part of this wonderful project organized by papa and Kevin Buckland. “Connect the climate dot project at Braeburn, Nairobi. Papa is a dancer, choreographer and climate organizer in Kenya. He uses movement as a way to understand and share what is happening around him. Currently he is the choreographer and assistant director for Ondieki the Fisherman, Kenya’s first opera. The piece was performed on May 5th. Papa has choreographed a series of circular motions and lighting forms into the fabric of the piece.

A contemporary commentary on climate change and its effects. The story is set in the shores of Lake Victoria and touches on the life of the fishermen. The main character (Ondieki) is a lazy and careless fisherman who doesn’t care about the storm and warnings of his elders. In the end the major character drowns and dies in the lake. Flood sweeps the populace and people mourn for the extreme loss.

The opera goes forth to tell about the connecting of dots that just about to take our world if we don’t put up measures to contain the effects of climate change especially in Africa. The opera focuses on the traditional knowledge by the indigenous people. It sis up to us to decode if we will let climate crisis take control of us at this time and age over the past centuries that have gone by. The focus is to remain knowledgeable and take control of our environment, lest we fall like ondieki.

Effects that are/were predicted to come in 20 years for much of the world are already making life much harder in most of Africa. Extreme droughts, melting glaciers, flash floods, desertification, hunger and other impacts are already becoming the norm in Africa – the continent that has done the least to cause the impacts it is now experiencing.

Still injustice continues to prevail.

Photography :: Joe Lukhovi

Choreographer:: papa